Tuscaloosa, Alabama Therapists

Find a therapist in Tuscaloosa, Alabama  that meets your needs. Browse our comprehensive list of affordable and licensed therapists in Tuscaloosa to find a professional specializing in counseling people with stress, anxiety, depression, relationship issues, grief and more.

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Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

Mark Banaszek is an individual and group therapist at Integrative Health Services with 15 years of experience working with child, adolescents, individuals, and families. He has experience working with school systems and other agencies throughout...
Maggie Klyce
LICSW, PIP, CEDS
In-Person Sessions:

Hoover, Alabama

I am a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist and an EMDR therapist.  I serve as President on the Alabama Chapter of the International Association for Eating Disorder Professionals and am a national presenter on the topic of eating disorders and...
In-Person Sessions:

Hoover, Alabama

Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama, Georgia

A possess a doctorate degree in counseling psychology and I am a Licensed Professional Counselor in Alabama and Georgia as well as a life Coach with over 20 years of mental health experience working across the life span in various treatment...
Katie Beaugez
MEd, ALC
Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

Hi there! I’m Katie Beaugez—or Katie Bee, if that’s easier. I’m a licensed mental health counselor who provides therapy services for individuals and families. My philosophy as a counselor is that everyone should have access to good therapy,...
Stephanie Lett
LICSW, PIP
In-Person Sessions:

Birmingham, Alabama

Thank you for visiting Love Out Loud Counseling and Consulting Services, LLC. My name is Stephanie Lett. I have dedicated nearly a decade to serving others in order to improve society. My profession is much more than a tool for me to earn a...
Miles Hudson
LICSW-PIP
Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

Miles Hudson is an individual and group therapist at Forge Wellness. He enjoys working with adults and adolescents who are looking for solutions to life's challenges. He works with clients facing a range of issues including, addiction, trauma,...
Sharmen Marshall
MA, LPC, ICADC, AADC, CCTP
In-Person Sessions:

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

Life isn't always easy. At times, things just don't seem right or the way that we would like for them to be. Life can be frustrating, overwhelming, complicated and down-right messy. It is during these difficult seasons that I would like to come...
Vanessa Goepel
LPC 172, LPC-S 7
In-Person Sessions:

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

Counseling serves as a guide to assist with life's struggles and stressors. Whether new to counseling or having experienced a similar counseling relationship, my ideal client is motivated for change and ready to learn new approaches to thinking and...
April Calvin
LPC-Supervisor 1
In-Person Sessions:

Birmingham, Alabama

Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

My name is April Anderson Calvin, I am a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of Alabama with over 20 years of experience in the helping field. I am a proud graduate of The Jacksonville State University with a Master of Science Degree in...
Kylie Howell
LPC 172
Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

Kylie Howell is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), Nationally Certified Counselor, and Registered Yoga Instructor who specializes in supporting clients with anxiety, stress management, grief and loss, depression, and self-esteem using a...
Heather MacLeod
LICSW, CEAP, CCM
In-Person Sessions:

Tuscaloosa, Alabama

I am experienced in working with adults and adolescents, and my areas of expertise include general mental health (such as stress management, depression, and anxiety), anger management, communication skills, work issues, management consultation,...
Michelle Knight
LICSW-PIP
In-Person Sessions:

Hoover, Alabama

Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

TELEHEALTH now provided!! Now accepting MEDICAID/MEDICARE!! Integrative Health Services, LLC focuses on treating the mind, body, and spirit. Everyone is not the same and therefore, treatment is tailored to fit the individual needs of each person....
Aisha Thorn
MA, LPC, NCC
In-Person Sessions:

Alabaster, Alabama

Teletherapy for Clients In:

Alabama

I believe that each person is the expert of their life. I also believe that at times we all need an objective person to listen and to help us find our center. I strive to meet each person where they are, no judgements, no preconceived ideas. I...

An Overview of Mental Health in Tuscaloosa, Alabama

The city of Tuscaloosa is the fifth-largest in the state of Alabama. It is the seat of the centrally-located Tuscaloosa County, with an estimated population of just over 100,000 according to 2017 U.S. Census Bureau data. That survey also revealed other notable factors potentially influencing mental wellness in the region, including above-average rates of those living in poverty and those without health insurance.

A reported 23.9% of Tuscaloosa’s population lives below the poverty line, compared to a United States average of 12.3%. The uninsured segment of the city is estimated at 11.5%, also higher than the national figure of 10.2%. These numbers can indicate both an elevated rate of mental health issues in the area, as well as an insufficient ability to address them via professional services.

The Link Between Poverty and Depression

Poverty and poor health are often directly linked, a connection that certain applies when it comes to mental health. A 2012 survey assembled by Gallup estimates a nearly doubled rate of depression suffered by those living in poverty (30.9% versus 15.8% in the non-impoverished population).

Further, the study suggests that living below this financial threshold can place a person or family at greater risk of numerous physical health conditions. Reported rates of asthma, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and heart attack risk were all found to be 2-5% higher than the rest of the population on average.

Fewer persons covered by health insurance likely exacerbates these problems, making it difficult for a larger portion of the population to seek the care they need.

Impact of Prescription Opioids

While a lack of health insurance can contribute to negative mental conditions, other risks can arise for those who seek medical treatment for chronic physical pain. This is due to the recent trend of patients misusing prescribed painkillers, a dangerous behavior that could result in chemical dependency or even life-threatening overdose.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse revised a study in March of 2018, finding that 21-29% of patients misused opioids recommended for chronic pain management. Of particular concern for those in and around Tuscaloosa are findings by the Associated Press (AP) that Alabama ranks highest in the United States in terms of opioid use overall.

As of 2015, the national average of opioid prescriptions per person stood at 0.71. By comparison, Alabama’s state average was estimated at 1.2 per person, or a total of nearly 6 million prescriptions in the state as a whole, according to the AP joint investigation.

While prescription drugs are certainly not the sole, and perhaps not even foremost chemical threat, it must be noted that dependency and depression do frequently go hand in hand. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America advises that about one in five persons suffering from mood or mental disorders also battle substance abuse problems as well.

Demographics and Depression in Tuscaloosa

Another point of interest from the 2017 U.S. Census Survey is Tuscaloosa’s demographic divide; the city is made up primarily of Caucasian (52.2%) and African-American (43.3%) residents. While specific figures are not readily available to specify which of the two segments suffers more frequently from mental health problems, there are facts worth noting:

  • The African-American community comprises the majority of those living in poverty, with a 53.8% share according to five-year African Community Survey data for the state of Alabama.
  • Wages were found to be nearly 1.5 times higher for those who reported as white versus those in the black community during 2016.
  • Shortcomings in the workforce were reflected in the education sector as well, with higher rates of high school and college graduation among whites versus those for blacks.

Economic disparities are certainly not unique to Tuscaloosa or the state of Alabama. However, any region where the minority community makes up a large portion of the population is potentially more susceptible to the effects of poor mental health per capita.